Julie Langelier

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Proteins Use a Lock and Key System to Bind to DNA

Proteins Use a Lock and Key System to Bind to DNA

You can think of DNA as a string of letters—As, Cs, Ts, and Gs—that together spell out the information needed for the construction and function of cells. Each cell in your body shares the same DNA. So, for cells to…

Two Possible New Ways to Treat Silent Seizures in Children

Two Possible New Ways to Treat Silent Seizures in Children

As early as 3 months of age, infants with a severe form of epilepsy called Dravet syndrome start having convulsive seizures, during which their arms and legs jerk repeatedly. As they become toddlers, another type of seizure begins to appear.…

New Insights Into the Aging Brain

New Insights Into the Aging Brain

The protein klotho has been shown to promote longevity and counteract aging-related impairments. Having more klotho seems to allow for longer and healthier lives, whereas a depletion of this molecule accelerates aging and may contribute to age-related diseases. Curiously, within…

New Immunotherapy Targeting Blood-Clotting Protein Protects Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease Models

Normally, the blood protein fibrin does not enter the brain. But in several neurological disorders, the blood-brain barrier—which keeps large molecules in the blood from entering the brain—becomes abnormally permeable, allowing fibrin to leak into the brain and trigger inflammation.…

$3.6 Million to Study Adverse Effects of Genome Editing

As genome editing technologies quickly advance toward clinical therapies, they are raising hopes of a completely new way to treat disease. They are also bringing to light a number of challenges that need to be addressed before potential treatments can…

Scientists Mimic the Earliest Stages of Human Development

Human embryos start as a tiny mass of cells that are all the same. The first step in growing from a homogenous ball of cells into a complex individual with distinct organs and tissues is for the cells to divide…

New Era of Philanthropy at the Gladstone Institutes

Robert Wicks has been appointed as the new vice president of philanthropy at the Gladstone Institutes and CEO of the Gladstone Foundation. A former educator and entrepreneur, Wicks served for over a decade in leadership roles at Stanford University and…

Scientists Examine Variations in a Cell's Protein Factory

You can think of a cell in your body like a miniature factory, creating a final product called proteins, which carry out various tasks and functions. In this cellular factory, genes control the series of sequential steps needed to create…

Gladstone Scientists Map Interactions Between Head and Neck Cancer and HPV Virus

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely known to cause nearly all cases of cervical cancer. However, you might not know that HPV also causes 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancer, a subset of head and neck cancers that affect the mouth, tongue,…

Jennifer Doudna Opens Lab at the Gladstone Institutes

Biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, PhD, has revolutionized biomedical research—and so many other fields—by first unlocking the CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technique in 2012. Now, she is moving part of her research efforts to the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, where she…

Marius Wernig Awarded the 2018 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize by the Gladstone Institutes

Marius Wernig, MD, Ph.D., was announced today as the winner of the 2018 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize by the Gladstone Institutes. Wernig is an associate professor of pathology at the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford…

Two Molecules Offer Great Potential to Combat Cancer and Chronic Infections

To fight viral infections, your immune system calls on CD8 T cells to kill the infected cells. The CD8 T cells can also be used in immunotherapy approaches to kill cancer cells, including the CAR T cell therapy currently attracting broad public attention. “The problem…

New Approach to Fight Tuberculosis, a Leading Cause of Death Worldwide

Tuberculosis is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. Nearly 2 million people die every year from this infectious disease, and an estimated 2 billion people are chronically infected. The only vaccine, developed almost 100 years ago, offers…

A New Research Partnership to Find Treatments for Neurological Disorders

BioMotiv and Cure Network Dolby Acceleration Partners (CNDAP) have entered into an agreement to develop small molecules that could provide new treatment options for patients with neurological disorders, such as Dravet syndrome, other epilepsies, and Alzheimer’s disease. This work is…

Discovery of How HIV Hedges Its Bets Opens the Door to New Therapies

A stem cell is one with infinite possibilities. So, for decades, scientists have puzzled over how the cell chooses to keep being a stem cell and continue dividing or specialize into a specific cell type, like a heart or brain…

Deep Learning: A Superhuman Way to Look at Cells

It’s harder than you might think to look at a microscope image of an untreated cell and identify its features. To make cell characteristics visible to the human eye, scientists normally have to use chemicals that can kill the very…

Scientists Learn How to Avoid a Roadblock When Reprogramming Cells

Over a decade ago, Shinya Yamanaka and Kazutoshi Takahashi made a discovery that would revolutionize biomedical research and trigger the field of regenerative medicine. They learned how to reprogram human adult cells into cells that behave like embryonic stem cells.…

Scientists Fix Genetic Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease in Human Brain Cells

Scientists Fix Genetic Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease in Human Brain Cells

Using human brain cells, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered the cause of — and a potential solution for — the primary genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, a gene called apoE4. Having one copy of the apoE4 gene more…

Cell Therapy Could Improve Brain Function for Alzheimer's Disease

Cell Therapy Could Improve Brain Function for Alzheimer's Disease

Like a great orchestra, your brain relies on the perfect coordination of many elements to function properly. And if one of those elements is out of sync, it affects the entire ensemble. In Alzheimer’s disease, for instance, damage to specific…

Unlocking a Cell's Potential to Regenerate the Heart

Unlocking a Cell's Potential to Regenerate the Heart

Some organisms have a remarkable capacity for regenerating tissue. If a fish or salamander suffers heart damage, for instance, their cells are able to divide and successfully repair the injured organ. Imagine if you could do the same. In the…

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